Kratom Faces a New Challenge in New Jersey

Kratom faces another new state regulation and possible ban in New Jersey. State Assemblyman Ron Dancer is slated to introduce legislation that would prohibit the sale, possession and use of Kratom.

It seems likely that Assemblyman Dancer doesn't understand the vast difference between Kratom plants that are pure and naturally occurring; and Kratom that has been adulterated with synthetic compounds (we'll call this spiked Kratom). Though relatively rare, spiked Kratom is sadly and most often marketed as "legal highs," causing all this confusion and we would like to see these taken off the market as much as he does.

When Dancer says his legislation is intended to "help prevent another drug crisis like the current heroin epidemic in Monmouth and Ocean counties," he must be referring to something other than the Kratom tree. Kratom, as we know, is sought most by people seeking it for its medicinal benefits, not a "legal high."

We must stop the spread of misinformation or selective facts and provide our legislators with the legitimate facts about unadulterated, pure Kratom. We, the users, who are responsible, law-abiding, productive members of society, need to make this distinction clear to politicians, law enforcement officials, and concerned parents.

It's clear we have a lot of educating to do and misconceptions to clear up. We need your help.

Assemblyman Dancer's press release rightly identifies Kratom as a "botanical," "that grows naturally in Southeast Asia," but really, that's where the facts end.

Naturally occurring Kratom is a safe and pure product. Spiked Kratom, where synthetic compounds (or additional alkaloids) are added, again while rare, can have harmful side effects. Manufacturers selling these products and marketing them as "legal highs," not dietary supplements are not supported by us or welcome in the business and this kind of deceptive marketing is unacceptable.

States such as New Jersey appear to be confusing pure, naturally occurring Kratom with the relatively rare products that have been spiked with synthetic chemicals. Synthetic chemicals added to Kratom are the real problem and vendors need to make sure that what they sell is pure.

To ban all Kratom because some has been spiked with synthetic chemicals is like "throwing the baby out with the bathwater."

As you may have seen, there have been articles and interviews across the country claiming that the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) calls Kratom a "drug of concern." That is simply not the case. For decades, it has been DEA's responsibility to research and continue learning about drugs and chemicals that are available to Americans. Kratom is no exception and over the years DEA has concluded Kratom does not warrant their concern. See this: Palm Beach Post

Kratom is not on the Drug Enforcement Agency's list of "Drugs and Chemicals of Concern," and is legal in the U.S., with the exception of four states that have passed state bans--because of the kind of misinformation Assemblyman Dancer is basing his legislation on.

In many of these misguided regulatory efforts the stated objective is "to protect the children" that might obtain Kratom, particularly Kratom that's been spiked, and abuse it. That is a real concern and a concern we share. Safe, responsible users like us believe Kratom should be regulated for minors, just like tobacco.

Though we'd prefer it to not be this way, it's up to us to help legislators like Assemblyman Dancer to understand how and why we use plant-based Kratom. Our stories are powerful and our voices are credible. We can and should politely and professionally promote positive change to ensure Kratom remains available for those who can benefit from it most.

Do you live in New Jersey? Contact your representatives and Assemblyman Dancer and tell them the truth about Kratom and responsible users like you and me. And join us, so the American Kratom Association can be more effective in representing you.

Be the first to comment

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.

Take Action & Join the Conversation

Tell us your story Donate


Sign Up

Take Action & Join the Conversation